10

Although there exists a dedicated History of science and mathematics SE site, the math or stats sites sometimes have questions about the history of a symbol, of a theorem. Those are quite interesting, to grow connections, rise interest. While I am not a high-level gardener, I believe such questions could be appropriate, and could be better by linking to ...


9

There is a way to get your questions to have that kind of attention You have to get the question into the HNQ (Hot Network Questions). All of the sites in Stack Exchange have an HNQ feed along the right side of the questions for the base URL. The Gardening & Landscaping HNQ feed can be seen here below the site stats. You need collaborates. In ...


5

I always edit these questions when I see them. I just did two today, changing "what is this plant?" to something that includes descriptive adjectives based on what I saw in the pictures. I do this for three reasons: to encourage possible answerers to click the link to leave a more searchable QA pair for future Googlers (and thus increase site traffic among ...


5

I think it is reasonable to have these minimum standards: a picture a location Even indoor plants can be more easily identified if you know what part of the world the plant is located in.


5

As long as you don’t follow the pattern of bad identification questions (nondescript title, a blurry photo of something green, no details on location or environment...), you are free to post as many questions as you are willing to type (and the system permits within a certain time frame). In other words: Post good quality questions, please, and we will be ...


4

My first impulse is to say off topic, as explained below, but I invite the community to chime in. We have in the past for example accepted questions on mosquito control (with some prior discussion and controversy), but decided that they are just this side of the fence because it’s both a very common problem, affecting the way gardeners use their garden and ...


4

This seems like a good and difficult question. I would be disappointed if identification questions were banned, but I do see that that is the easiest and possibly best way forward. The hardest part about trying to add a textual description to make the identification questions searchable is that visual descriptions can vary quite a bit for the same plant ...


4

In general I agree, but there are exceptions: wild plants: sometime an image with a nearby flower (and thus identify the flower in one question) is much easier (or just possible). some plants require a host. For orchids and epiphytes: they are just one identification. plant and disease (or fungi or insects): identification of both plant and disease (etc.) ...


4

All aspects of your proposed question look on-topic to me. The initial hurdle appears to be the fact that the trees were in the woods, not in your garden, but we have other questions about stuff found in the wild. A couple of well-upvoted examples spring to mind (there are others): What is this large, woody plant with compound leaves, found in zone 6a? ...


3

I'm going to go in a different direction. My guess is the questions that have high view counts also do well in search engines. Gardening and landscape content has gotten to be a pretty competitive subject and there are a few content mills in the space. sfgate and gardenguides I think are two of the ones I see all the time. I'm not a big fan of content mills ...


3

Simply put, this site has been around for almost five years. Some questions were posted almost five years ago, and have been accruing views all that time, while some were posted today and haven't had the opportunity yet. As I write this, the front page has a few questions with over 10,000 views and all were asked in 2011: How do you safely and effectively ...


1

While I'm at first inclined to say, no, it's not on-topic on G&L, the presence of hookworms in the soil could be a problem just as much as say, yellow jackets (and not just for pets). However, hookworms probably aren't something people usually think about in a gardening and landscaping context, since they don't typically interfere with gardening and ...


1

In my professional experience, people ask the name of a plant (or ID) because they just want to know what the hell is growing in that corner, or what the plant they've just been given is, or whether that thing that's just popped up is a pernicious weed or a plant they might want. There doesn't have to be anything particularly startling about its growth habit ...


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